Identity Politics Weren’t A Factor In Elections

Most of the midterm election results are in and it’s absolutely no secret that Americans placed a decisive referendum on the Democrat policy agenda and record last night. No matter how this will be downplayed or spun by the traditional media- and it will be, it’s beyond a doubt that the American electorate has soured, at least for now, on Democrat so-called leadership and vision for the country.

I’m happy to say that the overall strategy of identity/racial politics Democrats employed wasn’t successful. Places like Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Maryland, Wisconsin, and Louisiana who gambled and used disgusting, emotionally manipulating, race-baiting, get-out-the-vote strategies to provoke blacks to the polls, failed.

In several states in which racial paranoia was used as a tactic, Republicans:

  • held the governorship in Alabama;
  • held the governorship, held the Senate and picked up a House seat in Georgia;
  • won the Senate seat in North Carolina
  • won the governorship in Maryland;
  • held the governorship in Wisconsin;
  • will likely win the Senate seat in Louisiana after a December run-off. This would have been a solid win if two Republicans hadn’t stupidly run and split the vote.

But in two other races where identity politics weren’t in play, the results were historical.

In one race, Tim Scott became the first black Senator elected from the old Confederacy since Reconstruction. He was originally appointed to the Senate by South Carolina governor Nikki Haley to finish the term of previous Senator, Jim DeMint who vacated the seat to return to the private sector.

In the other race, Utahns made Mia Love the first black Republican woman elected to Congress.

Again, in both of these races identity politics factored in very, very, little. These contests were about policies, values, leadership and character. Voters in both states, respectively, decided that Scott and Love were best suited to represent the needs and interests of their states.

There’s a lesson in here somewhere…

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